Pigflu cheatsheet

So in the last couple days we’ve all been seeing the news, and tweets about the pig flu. Rumor has it that Mexico (where the virus originated) is going to be shutting down schools, public transporation and the border to keep the virus from spreading.
All in all it seems that the advice for this thing is pretty much the same advice during standard flu season. If its in your neighborhood, dont play pattycake with your neighbors. Be cleanly, and if you get sick make sure to clean up after yourself and stay away from others to prevent the spread of the thing.

Here are some helpful (but still common-sense-y type) tips to help you stay healthy (lovingly jacked from the CDC site):

There are everyday actions people can take to stay healthy.

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hands cleaners are also effective.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread that way.

Try to avoid close contact with sick people.

  • Influenza is thought to spread mainly person-to-person through coughing or sneezing of infected people.
  • If you get sick, CDC recommends that you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.

What are the symptoms of swine flu in humans?
The symptoms of swine flu in people are expected to be similar to the symptoms of regular human seasonal influenza and include fever, lethargy, lack of appetite and coughing. Some people with swine flu also have reported runny nose, sore throat, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

Can people catch swine flu from eating pork?
No. Swine influenza viruses are not transmitted by food. You can not get swine influenza from eating pork or pork products. Eating properly handled and cooked pork and pork products is safe. Cooking pork to an internal temperature of 160°F kills the swine flu virus as it does other bacteria and viruses.

What medications are available to treat swine flu infections in humans?
There are four different antiviral drugs that are licensed for use in the US for the treatment of influenza: amantadine, rimantadine, oseltamivir and zanamivir. While most swine influenza viruses have been susceptible to all four drugs, the most recent swine influenza viruses isolated from humans are resistant to amantadine and rimantadine. At this time, CDC recommends the use of oseltamivir or zanamivir for the treatment and/or prevention of infection with swine influenza viruses.

All in all it seems like its just another strain of the regular flu – nothing to really get up in arms about. Just don’t be going to makeout parties with sick people, and duck the flying snots and you’ll be good to go!

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